EFFECTS OF EVENTS

Most random events present a risk for loss of money or regency, or force a regent to respond by expending an action in the domain turn. If an event has no immediate effect on game mechanics, losses of regency or Stability, etc. take place at the end of the domain turn.

RESPONSES TO EVENTS

Most random events require a response during the domain turn or severely penalize a regent who ignores them. In general, five basic strategies exist for a ruler to respond to an event.

Regent Action: The character expends an action in the domain turn to address the situation personally. At the DM's discretion, this can result in an adventure; events such as assassination, monsters, and intrigue lend themselves to impromptu adventures.

Regent Dictate: The PC decides how the matter should be handled and appoints someone to carry out his plan. If monsters are eating a village, for example, he might order a nearby garrison to increase patrols, or he might hire adventurers to negotiate with or kill the monsters. A dictate doesn't require an action. Solving problems by decree is better than ignoring them, but is not as effective as personal attention.

Skilled Lieutenant: The PC searches out the perfect candidate for the job and dispatches him to the scene. In the example above, he might send the Royal Huntmaster, a 6th-level ranger, to confront the monsters. Sending a. bard to a diplomatic situation or a mage to investigate magical occurrences are excellent management strategies. Dispatching a lieutenant doesn't require an action.

Naturally, a lieutenant can address only one event per action round. If the lieutenant happens to be a PC, he must spend his action responding to the event. Sending a skilled lieutenant is the next best thing to doing something personally.

Unskilled Lieutenant: The regent doesn't have an individual qualified for the job, but sends someone who has a fair chance of managing it. This approach is usually only marginally successful. The DM determines whether a lieutenant is of an appropriate class or level to be skilled in the area in question.

Ignore the Issue: There's always s chance that a problem will go away even if the regent does nothing, but this is obviously not the preferred way to deal with most issues.

RESOLVING EVENT RESPONSES

If the regent chooses to send a lieutenant to the scene or chooses to ignore the problem, roll 1d6 on the Event Resolution Table (see below) to determine the outcome. If the regent responds by personal action or dictation of a response, the DM must assess the player's plan of action and assign a chance of success.

The DM establishes a range of outcomes (disastrous, poor, fair, etc.) based on possible die rolls. Success level is then determined by rolling on the Event Resolution Table below this represents whether the plan was carried out as the player intended.

Event Resolution Table

Regent Response

d6 roll

1

2

3

4

5

6

Ignore

D

P

P

P

P

F

Unskilled

D

P

F

F

F

G

Skilled

P

F

G

G

G

R

Dictate

*-2

*-1

*

*

*

*+1

Action

*

*

*

*

*

*

*: The DM assigns the level of success.

*-1, *-2, *+1: Modify assigned level of success A -1 result can change a fair outcome to a poor outcome, etc.

D: Disaster. The situation worsens: regency or gold losses increase.

P: Poor. The situation continues unabated.

F: Fair. The situation is resolved incompletely or at significant cost or loss. Regency or gold losses are lessened but not negated.

G: Good. The situation is handled competently and at modest cost.

R: Resounding success: The situation was dealt with thoroughly at negligible cost.